Health Benefits of Sage Tea

The Potential Health Benefits of Sage Tea

The Potential Health Benefits of Sage Tea

Since medieval times, sage, or Salvia officinalis has been regarded as an essential culinary and medicinal herb. As one saying from the period indicates:

“Why should a man die while sage grows in his garden?”

This perennial shrub with grayish-green leaves and purple flowers has been valued for many centuries. It was discovered in Mediterranean climates like ancient Egypt, Greece, and Rome, but today, sage is cultivated in gardens throughout the world.

Sage is valued for its pleasant, clean scent and the savory flavor it adds in cooking. Sage is a natural tonifier and has traditionally been used to aid digestion, promote a healthy appetite, calm an upset stomach, ease a sore throat, help for those suffering from diarrhea, promote healthy brain function, and promoting hormonal balance in women.

Sage is an excellent source of Vitamins A, B, C, and K and contains a number of volatile oils, flavonoids, phenolic acids, and other active constituents within its leaves. Steeping increases the potency of these naturally occurring chemicals and makes them easier to assimilate within the body.

sage leaves

The Antioxidant Properties of Sage Tea

Over the years, studies have shown that Salvia officinalis contains powerful antioxidant properties that can act to reduce free radicals and other stressors within the body that can create inflammation. While inflammation in the body is a part of its natural healing process, chronic inflammation can weaken the body and cause additional health issues and illnesses. Sage acts to prevent damage to cells and to stabilize and eliminate the mucus within the body that can increase the body’s susceptibility to illness and disease.

In a study conducted in Slovenia at the Agronomy Department of the University of Ljubljana, researchers found that the ursolic acid contained within sage leaves was more potent than the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in mice. Sage also contains carnosol and camphor. Both of these constituents act to stimulate blood flow within the body and the brain and further reduce inflammation.

Studies from research teams around the world have shown that the anti-inflammatory properties of sage can reduce the pain and swelling that is associated with arthritis and can give warming comfort on a cold and rainy day or any time. Sage acts as a natural diuretic that can help eliminate toxins within the body.

Sage and the Brain

Sage also has a reputation for helping those suffering from memory loss and may potentially slow the onset of Alzheimer’s disease and other age-related cognitive challenges. Researchers have found that sage tea can help reduce stress by easing feelings of irritation, agitation. Sitting down to a cup of tea with sage can help calm you down and soothe feelings of anxiety.

Another amazing benefit of sage tea is that it can also help to increase focus and promote retention of information.

Sage Tea

Sage Tea and Diabetes

For those suffering from or looking to prevent the onset of diabetes, sage tea can help to lower and normalize blood glucose levels. Those who drink sage tea regularly also have lower levels of bad cholesterol and higher levels of good cholesterol and can aid in fighting the effects of anemia.

Sage for Women’s Health – Sage contains phytoestrogens which can promote normal menstrual flow, relieve fatigue and depression, and normalize or elevate the mood in women suffering from morning sickness as well as premenstrual, perimenopausal, or menopausal symptoms that often occur with drastic hormonal changes happening within their bodies. Sage is also known to treat problems such as urinary tract infections and cystitis in both men and women alike.

Sage Tea for Healthy Skin, Teeth, and Hair

For centuries, herbalists and healers around the world have utilized sage tea to address several health issues, but it is also known to help in making you feel good both inside and out. Many people use sage tea to:

  • Treat gum diseases such as gingivitis and receding gums.
  • Strengthen and fortify the teeth.
  • Treat oral ulcers or mouth sores with its natural astringent properties.
  • Reduce the amount of oil on your skin that can cause blemishes.
  • Reduce excessive sweating.
  • Reduce the potential effects of sunburn by applying a weak tea infusion to the skin before and after sun exposure.
  • Increase the metabolism within the body and aid in weight loss.
  • Used as a rinse for the hair, sage helps absorb excess oil on the scalp and leaves the hair soft and shiny.

The Potential Health Benefits of Sage Tea

A sage tea rinse after shampooing can also reduce alopecia or hair loss, which can happen when we are stressed or as we age. By simply applying from roots to ends, massaging the infusion into the scalp, and then rinsing after 20 -30 minutes later can help reduce hair loss. Sage tea can also help clear up dandruff and dermatitis.

As promising as the benefits of sage are; however, we do advise that you consult with your physician before drinking sage tea, particularly if you are pregnant or nursing, or are taking other medications.

At Sir Jason Winters International, we’ll readily admit that we’re more than a little partial to the tasty goodness and potential benefits of drinking sage tea! Sir Jason Winters himself was a firm believer in the benefits of drinking sage tea regularly, and we include this herb in our Sir Jason Winters Classic Blend Herbal Tea. Regularly priced at $29.95, is now available for just $24.95 for a 5-ounce canister. If you want to save an additional 5% on your monthly or bi-weekly order, consider taking advantage of our convenient subscription service and get your tea delivered directly to your door and experience the delicious goodness of sage for yourself!

Resources

“The Encyclopedia of Medicinal Plants” by Andrew Chevallier, 1996, Dorling Kindersley Limited, London

The Chemotaxonomy of Common Sage (Salvia officinalis) Based on the Volatile Constituents” by Jonathan D. Craft, Prabodh Satyal, and William N. Setzer, 2017, Department of Chemistry, University of Alabama, Huntsville, Alabama

“Planetary Herbology: An Integration of Western Herbs Into the Traditional Chinese and Ayurvedic Systems” by Michael Tierra, 1998, Lotus Press, Twin Lakes, Wisconsin

“20,000 Secrets of Tea: The Most Effective Ways to Benefit from Nature’s Healing Herbs” by Victoria Zak, 1999, Dell Publishing, New York, New York

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