Focus on Brain Health with Gotu Kola

Two leaves of gotu kola a day will keep old age away.” – Ancient Indian proverb regarding gotu kola

For thousands of years, the Ayurvedic physicians of India and the traditional doctors of China have used gotu kola (Centella asiatica) to address a number of health concerns.

Also commonly known as Asiatic Pennywort, this herb is a member of the parsley family. Though its origins have been traced to Asia, gradually it spread throughout Africa and parts of Europe. Now that it is used as an herbal supplement, you can find it growing throughout the entire world.

Gotu kola mostly grows in temperate and tropical climates in places with much water like swamps. This herb has long, slender stems ranging in color from green to an almost reddish color, and it grows in tight clumps. The leaves are rounded and veined throughout. Occasionally it produces small, inconspicuous flowers, and it has rhizomatic roots that grow straight down.

A Long History of Traditional Uses

The entire plant has been used since antiquity to the modern day for many illnesses. Throughout Asia, ancient doctors traditionally used this “herb of longevity” to address skin disorders, including scar reduction and as treatment for leprosy.

Herbalists and healers around the world have also used gotu kola for digestive issues, bronchial concerns, and as a tonic to rejuvenate tired skin and veins, and improving concentration and memory. Today, it is this last use that gotu kola is most famous for, and where much of the research is aimed.

Recent Research Supporting the Use of Gotu Kola

The main compounds found within the herb gotu kola seem to balance the central nervous system and increase the concentration of GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid) within the brain. GABA is one of the most important neurotransmitters in the human body. Its primary purpose is to reduce the sensitivity of the nervous system.

According to a recent study conducted in Malaysia at the University of Kebangsaan in Kuala Lumpur in 2015-2016, the data suggests that some chemical constituents found within gotu kola act as neuroregenerative agents. These properties point to the possibility that it may be helpful either reducing incidences of early-onset dementia, Alzheimer’s, and other diseases that can affect memory and cognitive function as we age.

The scientific team in Malaysia also noted that the participants in the study seemed to have improved overall brain health, including learning and memory skills, and had been less prone to bouts of depression, anxiety, and stress.

One of the plausible reasons for this, according to the Malaysian study, is the possibility that gotu kola may also act as a neuron protector. The researchers hope that further study will prove that gotu kola can lessen the decline of loco-motor control. This is a characteristic of serious degenerative illnesses such as Parkinson’s disease.

What about the traditional use for skin diseases? A study conducted in South Africa researchers found that gotu kola contained compounds that seemed to have a balancing effect on connective tissue in the body.

The South African team found that in patients who had suffered second and third-degree burns, gotu kola caused a marked reduction of keloid scar tissue. Keloid tissue creates hard, large, and bumpy scars that are very hard to treat and can become disfiguring. They attributed this reduction, at least in part, to an increase in collagen production. This property also shortened the healing time for patients suffering from all types of severe burns.

Collagen is a crucial component of skin. It is the major protein that binds skin and connective tissue together. It also strengthens bones.

Incorporating Gotu Kola

Without a doubt, gotu kola is a powerful herb, but it must be used with care. Before adding gotu kola or any other supplements to your daily routine, it’s always a good idea to consult with your doctor first. Side effects of taking gotu kola may include dizziness, headaches, nausea, gastrointestinal discomfort, or feelings of over-tiredness.

Most importantly, there is a possibility of liver issues for some users. For those who have diabetes, patients being treated for liver disease, or are currently taking other medications, speak with your doctor before using it.

If you’ve been given the all-clear, you can give yourself the gift of good health with our full line of supplements with gotu kola. Here at Sir Jason Winters International, we have incorporated the finest herbs available on the market for our exclusive formulas. We have included the goodness of the herb gotu kola in both The Ultimate Combination (T.U.C.) supplements and our Xian Supplements.

Sir Jason Winters created the Ultimate Combination to include the six most important of the exotic herbs he had heard about in his travels around the world. We recommend taking 1 or 2 capsules daily with food.

Each bottle of T.U.C. is regularly priced at $17.50 for a bottle of 60 capsules. You can now try this formula for yourself at significant savings for just $15.95 per bottle. You can also save an additional 5% on each bottle by taking advantage of our convenient subscription service and have your supplements delivered directly to your home either once each month or every two weeks. Because this is such a great offer, we have to limit orders to five bottles per subscription.

Our Xian formula supplement contains the power of gotu kola as well as Indian sage, cayenne, and selenium. Both men and women can take this formula. Each bottle of 100 tablets is usually priced at $21.00 each. Right now, however, we are offering our Xian supplement to our customers for just $15.95.

By subscribing, you will receive your supplements either once every two weeks or once per month, you can save an additional 5% off the lower price. Again, we have to limit quantities to five per subscription to ensure supply to all of our customers.

If you have used these supplements in the past, we encourage you to leave a review on the product pages so others can know your experience!

Resources

“The Encyclopedia of Medicinal Plants” by Andrew Chevallier, 1996, D.K. Publishing, London, England, UK

“The School of Natural Healing” by Dr. John R. Christopher, (20th Anniversary Edition), 1996, Christopher Publications, Springville, UT

“The Family Herbal”: A Guide to Living Life with Energy, Health and Vitality” by Rosemary Gladstar, 2000, Storey Books, North Adams, MA

“Neuroprotective and Neuroregenerative Potential of Centella asiatica” by Yogeswaran Lokanathan1, Norazzila Omar1, Nur Nabilah Ahmad Puzi, et al., 2016, Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia

“Wound Healing Activities of Different Extracts of Centella asiatica for Incision and Burn Wounds” by J. Somboonwong, M. Kankaisre, and B. Tantisira, et al. 2012, B.M.C. Complementary Medicine and Therapies.

Planetary Herbology” by Michae Tierra, 1988, Lotus Press, Twin Lakes, WI

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